Book Reviews: “Hiding in the Hallway,” “Multipliers” and “Where Do I Find Jesus?”

"Hiding in the Hallway," "Multipliers" and "Where Do I Find Jesus?" are reviewed.

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Hiding in the Hallway: Anchoring Yourself as an MK

By Jeanne Harrison (New Hope)

Most Christians have encountered missionary kids, MKs, or in today’s language, third-culture kids. Because the boys and girls are raised where their parents serve and not in the countries of their parents’ culture, they live in-between. As a missionary kid herself, Jeanne Harrison offers a wealth of heart-felt, sensitive and practical advice in Hiding in the Hallway as she encourages Anchoring Yourself as an MK.

Harrison takes her title from two stories. She and her siblings often hid in the hallway in their home in the Philippines, “spying” on their parents’ meetings and ministry, constantly observing but never participating. Later in the United States, Jeanne hid in her school’s hallway, observing as she tried fit into a world of different clothes, new popular culture, and unfamiliar behavior norms.

The author explores four major ways third-culture kids suffer—feeling rootless, sacrificing comforts, living in a fishbowl in both cultures, and painfully leaving loved ones behind. She outlines common pitfalls, provides tips for furloughs, and lists practical ways to be on mission anywhere. She covers dating, making friends, combating loneliness, and emerging from parents’ shadows. Harrison includes an emotional letter written by a third-culture kid to her parents and closes with two certainties—hardship and hope.

Although Jeanne Harrison clearly writes to missionary kids, Hiding in the Hallway is a must-read for any church that hosts missionary families and any Christian who regularly encounters third-culture kids whether as children, youth or adults.

Kathy Robinson Hillman, former president

Baptist General Convention of Texas

Waco

Where Do I Find Jesus?

By Sheila Walsh and illustrated by Sarah Horne (B&H Kids)

Author Sheila Walsh and illustrator Sarah Horne have produced another in B&H Kids award-winning “The Bible Is My Best Friend” series for children ages 4 to 8. Liam and Emma, their humorous dogs Charlie and Wilson, and friend Abby from The Bible Is My Best Friend Bible Storybook return in Where Do I Find Jesus?—written “to help lead your child to Christ.”

The twins invite Abby to attend Kids Club. After playing, singing and eating, the teacher shares the story of Zacchaeus. The children tell Miss Spencer they learned the need to look for Christ like Zacchaeus. Once home, a confused Abby searches everywhere for Jesus. Finally, Emma explains how Jesus lives in her heart. Emma and Liam’s mother appears with hot chocolate and helps Abby pray.

For a young reader, Charlie and Wilson’s quirky comments interrupt the flow, although they bring laughter. Girls and boys also like the colorful illustrations. While they may understand Abby’s need to look for Jesus, some point out that no one tells Abby why she needs to find Jesus and question how she knows so little if the Bible really is her best friend. Fortunately, a closing “Parent Connection” explains salvation in greater detail.

Where Do I Find Jesus? has a place, particularly for a child beginning to learn about Jesus. However at least initially, the book should be read alongside a knowledgeable adult.

Sawyer, Tucker and Chandler Hillman, ages 9, 7 and 4, with their grandmother

Kathy Robinson Hillman, former president

Baptist General Convention of Texas

Waco

Multipliers: Leading Beyond Addition

By Todd Wilson (Exponential Press)

The principle of Matthew 28:18-20 is key to this book by Todd Wilson, senior pastor of Calvary Memorial Church in Oak Park, Ill., and chairman and co-founder of the Center for Pastor Theologians.

Wilson’s work is exhaustive. He explains both how to do the process right and how to avoid doing it wrong. He also presents new strategies and ideas to multiply disciples in a church, as well as multiply by starting churches. This book will tell you if you’re an accumulator or a multiplier.

Furthermore, this is a resource that opens the door to additional free materials, free on-line assessment tools and a list to help you determine where your church is in its growth. Helpful endnotes also point readers to more resources.

This book would be a valuable tool for any pastor, staff member or layman who wants to see his or her church grow or start a new work. This book is phenomenal. It includes timely information on upcoming conferences throughout the United States, including one in Houston.

Anyone wanting to grow an existing church or start a church will enjoy this book.

Skip Holman, minister of discipleship

Northeast Baptist Church

San Antonio

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