Review: Allie’s Bayou Rescue and Running from Reality

Kathy Hillman reviews Allie’s Bayou Rescue and Running from Reality, two books in the "Princess in Camo" series for young readers by Missy and Mia Robertson of Duck Dynasty.

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Allie’s Bayou Rescue

Running from Reality

By Missy and Mia Robertson (Zonderkidz)

Fans who couldn’t get enough of Duck Dynasty during its six-year run will enjoy the new Princess in Camo books written by 15-year-old Mia Robertson and her mother Missy. Those who aren’t familiar with the television series, especially teens, will appreciate the adventures of the fictional Allie Carroway, her reality show family, her cousin exploits, her grounding in faith, and her honest handling of severe allergies and asthma not unlike Mia’s own physical challenges.

In the first volume, Allie’s Bayou Rescue, the 12-year-old Princess in Camo learns that living near Louisiana’s Bayous may be killing her. Moving to Arizona to escape asthma isn’t exactly on her wish list. Almost worse, she’s getting another cousin—this time a boy her age. Including a male in the Carroway cousins’ Diva Duck Blind treehouse sends Allie, Kendall, Lola and Ruby into an elaborate initiation scheme.

The girls arrange an overnight at Mamaw’s to put Hunter through his paces, but frogs, a thunderstorm, blackout, flood, lost epi-pen and gator all sabotage the plans with near fatal consequences. Relying on faith, prayers and grit, the five miraculously survive and stumble onto a family secret—Andy, an uncle they never knew they had. Ultimately, Hunter saves the day in more ways than one.

Running from Reality, the series’ second book, finds the cousins determined to go on strike from Carried Away with the Carroways. They’ve had enough of being embarrassed on camera with every move orchestrated and each piece of clothing chosen by wardrobe. They want nothing more of posing for fan selfies or signing autographs.

Their parents overrule them, but Papaw Ray devises a plan. He sends Allie and the cousins on a California adventure with one condition—no phones except those that only make calls, no cameras, and no Internet. Supervised by Allie’s older brother and sister-in-law, the five manage plenty of adventure and even help the police foil a robbery. Unfortunately, Allie’s diary is the only record except in the kindness they show and the lasting friend Allie makes.

Entertaining, even if a bit implausible, the Princess in Camo shares her real life struggles and growing faith in Allie’s Bayou Rescue and Running from Reality. Preteens and early teens, particularly girls, will find faith and encouragement written on the pages.

Kathy Robinson Hillman, former president
Baptist General Convention of Texas
Waco

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