Around the State: Buckner enters agreement with Lifeline Children’s Services

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Buckner Children and Family Services entered into an agreement to provide temporary foster care for children in Texas on behalf of Lifeline Children’s Services. Lifeline, a faith-based domestic and international child placement agency headquartered in Birmingham, Ala., opened its first Texas offices last June. The organization approached Buckner, seeking temporary respite care and/or foster care services for infants and children being considered for adoption placement through Lifeline. According to the agreement, Buckner will provide interim homes for children connected with a potential adoption plan. All interim homes will be state-approved foster homes, and placement services are provided on an as-needed basis. Buckner also will provide for the physical, medical and emotional needs of all children in care, as requested by Lifeline. “Finding homes for vulnerable children in Texas is something Buckner has done for 140 years, and we are honored to use our experience to help Lifeline continue to grow its operations and carry out its mission of ensuring all God’s children have a loving home,” said Albert Reyes, president and CEO of Buckner International. Last year, Buckner oversaw the care of nearly 1,500 children in foster care in Texas and internationally and placed about 120 children with permanent adoptive families in Texas; Lifeline facilitated 190 international adoptions from 13 countries and 17 domestic adoptions.

The Global Center for Mental Healthcare and Ministry at Houston Baptist University will host specialized training, “The Opioid Addiction Crisis: Creating an Effective Church and Community Collaboration and Resolution Strategy,” from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Feb. 16. The training is designed for mental health leaders, pastors, laity, coaches, concerned family members and community leaders. Panelists include Shannon Rose and Ben O’Dell, the Center for Faith and Opportunity Initiatives for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Matt Stanford, CEO of the Hope and Healing Center & Institute in Houston; Michael Lyles, psychiatrist; John Spoede, director of the Center for Research and Doctoral Studies in the HBU College of Education and Behavioral Sciences; and David Jenkins, professor of counseling at Liberty University. Registration cost is $49 before Feb. 1 ($29 for students) and $89 after that date. To register, click here.

Retirement

Mike Couch from First Baptist Church in Big Spring, effective Jan. 31, after 38 years as minister of education and administration.

 


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