TPL_BPS_LINK_SKIP_TO_CONTENT TPL_BPS_LINK_SKIP_TO_NAV
Letter

Letters: Change back to the past

Change back to the past

I’m not a college- or seminary-educated person, but I was brought up in the Baptist faith, saved and baptized in a Baptist church. We keep talking about change. I believe we need to change back to the past.

Go back to preaching the gospel from the pulpit. Quit the watered-down, feel-good sermons. When was the last time you heard a sermon on sin—calling it what it is—and the consequences of sin? When was the last time you heard a sermon on the reality of hell? When was the last time the church took a stand against sin in their community? When was the last time the church went to their local school board and told them, “We want our children back—quit having activities on Sundays”?

How many in our churches can tell you why they are Baptist? How many can tell you what “BGCT” or “SBC” stands for? I’m afraid not very many.

I remember hearing Ergun Caner commenting when he was at Liberty University that we have young people enrolling in college who wear the shirts with “I love Jesus” and “Praise God.” They probably could win some lost person to Christ but could not tell you if Malachi is in the Old or New Testament.

I’m afraid this is truer than we would like to admit.

F.A. Taylor

Kempner

Ethics: Simple dimple

“Christian ethics more than guidelines for making decisions …”  was the most confusing article I ever read! I needed a dictionary to understand that.

Furthermore, I still am a believer in the simpler theory: Whatever a decision someone makes concerning the living God—obeying/disobeying the Bible—the commitments/noncommitments to him drag behind.

Also, simply put, if you do what God wants you to do, he will bless you. It gets to where, even in one’s subconscious, one behaves in such a way not only because he’s commanded to in the Bible, but also because he is blessed with the Lord’s presence and guidance in his life. Who wouldn’t want that?

That’s how a person’s beliefs towards God are formed. It’s simple dimple.

Elizabeth Beene

Dallas

 
 
 
Care to comment?

Send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , our editor.
Maximum length for publication is 250 words.
 
The Baptist Standard is supported by donors, subscribers and advertisers.

Connect with the Baptist Standard

Facebook  Twitter  Google+  RSS

About These Ads

More News

Design & Development by Toolbox Studios